The Journey: Episode Twenty-One

AUGUST 30, 2020

I had my doctor appointment on Thursday. I’m a little confused. I told my doctor all about my difficulties with my 85 units of Lantus and my blood sugar not being within range. We were concerned that my A1C hadn’t improved. So he decided to prescribe Novolog Mix 70/30. He wants me to take 50 units twice a day, 15 minutes before a meal.

What I’m confused about is, am I taking both Lantus and Novolog? I forgot to ask on the phone appointment and when I called the office an hour later to change pharmacies. I had to go with the Walgreen’s in my area because of the price. CVS would have charged me almost $250 per box, whereas Walgreens could catch me at $140, I hope. I’d have to use GoodRx for this one. But if I still have to take Lantus, then it’s cheaper at CVS. Then my pills are all at another pharmacy. All of this because my health insurance won’t cover insulin.

So because I don’t know if I’m taking both, I ran out of Lantus, I don’t have any money for either of them, and my Walgreens was fresh out of Novolog so I have to wait until Monday afternoon to see if it came in and take my insurance cards to them. I also have to hope they’ll take my GoodRx for the price it says. If not then I’m not going to be able to take this insulin AT ALL. This is so frustrating, not being able to afford your medication.

My last dose was Thursday night and since then I’ve had to rely on my cinnamon tea and berberine supplements. Surprisingly, they’ve been holding me at an okay morning blood sugar. It’s not within range but it’s not over 150 either so that’s good. I’m wondering if my insulin really is working or if this whole time it’s been the tea and berberine that’s gotten my number down in the morning. I’d like to try and purchase at least one box of Novolog to see if it will be more effective.

I’m so upset. He was going to prescribe me Ozempic, which I know worked, but it was over $400 for ONE PEN. I had it for one month last year and I was only able to buy it because my sister and best friend loaned me money to get it. But I can’t afford it now with this pandemic. I don’t know what to do. We have bills to pay, my unemployment benefit claim is going to be up soon (and that was only $200 every two weeks), and my husband doesn’t make enough for the bills but too much to qualify for unemployment.

Because of this, I’ve decided to start selling merchandise for my blog. If the sales can cover the monthly costs for my blog, then that’s one less thing we have to worry about each month. If you’re interested in pre-ordering some stickers, you can find the post on Instagram or on my Facebook page.

Also, I’m trying to kickstart my merchandise so I can eventually open an online shop and prepare for World Diabetes Day and National Diabetes Awareness Month this November. I’m always coming up with sticker designs and there will be new ones added every time. This pre-order is to help me order more stickers. Please think about supporting. I know it’s not a great time right now with the pandemic but anything helps.

Hopefully, next week I’ll be able to update you folks that I was able to buy my insulin and my numbers are looking better. I have no idea what the future holds but I can only hope that it looks bright.

Cinnamon Tea & Diabetes

Cinnamon tea has a lot of health benefits. Just boil some water and steep a stick of cinnamon for 10 to 15 minutes and you can reap the benefits. Don’t have a cinnamon stick? A teaspoon of ground cinnamon works just as well.

The benefits of drinking cinnamon are numerous and don’t just benefit diabetics.

  1. Loaded with antioxidants. Antioxidants help fight off oxidation caused by free radicals that contribute to diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease.
  2. Lowers inflammation and may improve heart health. Inflammation is thought to be at the root of many chronic diseases including heart disease. Cinnamon may also increase levels of HDL cholesterol.
  3. May help reduce blood sugar. Cinnamon may contribute to the lowering of insulin resistance thus increasing insulin’s effectiveness. Cinnamon may also slow the breakdown of carbs in your gut which will regulate your blood sugar levels.
  4. May promote weight loss. Studies don’t completely control all factors, like calorie intake, but if you control your calorie intake and take about 5 teaspoons of cinnamon powder per day for 12 weeks.
  5. Fights off bacteria and fungi. Cinnamon has antibacterial and antifungal properties which prevents the growth of bacteria, fungi, and molds, like Staphylococcus, Salmonella, and E. coli bacteria. It can also help reduce bad breath and prevent tooth decay.
  6. May reduce menstrual cramps and other PMS symptoms. Cinnamon tea can help make symptoms more bearable. You can take 3 grams of cinnamon each day for the first 3 days of your menstrual cycle.
  7. May fight skin aging. Cinnamon may promote collagen formation and increase skin elasticity and hydration.
  8. May have anticancer properties. Cinnamon extracts may help kill certain types of cancer cells, including skin cancer cells.
  9. May help preserve brain function. Cinnamon can help protect brain cells from Alzheimer’s disease and improve motor function in those with Parkinson’s disease.
  10. May help fight HIV.
  11. May reduce acne. Cinnamon can help fight the bacteria that causes acne.

7-11 are not completely concrete benefits of cinnamon tea. More research is being done to come to strong conclusions.

So cinnamon tea has a lot of benefits for all. For diabetics, it can help with insulin resistance and might even help you lose weight. You can either have it as a tea or as infused water. Just remember to keep your cinnamon intake low. Too much could be toxic. The compound coumarin is both beneficial and toxic for your liver.

If you do drink cinnamon tea, stick to one or two cinnamon sticks a day, or two teaspoons max. But go ahead and reap the benefits.


REFERENCES

Healthline
NDTV Food


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The Journey: Episode Twenty

AUGUST 23, 2020

Well nothing really to report. However, I got my blood test done for my A1C and my number isn’t looking too hot. I was at 7.9 in April and now I’m at 8.2. So it’s gone up a little bit and I’m not too happy about that. All the insulin injections and blood sugar checks and I’m no better. But on the bright side at least it’s not at 11% like it was last year so in a year’s time I’ve managed to drop by 3% so that’s good news.

My doctor appointment with my endocrinologist is this Thursday so I’ll have an update by next episode.

I’ve been drinking the cinnamon tea some more. I talked with my diabetes coach and she said there was no concrete evidence it really helps to lower your blood sugar. I decided to make an experiment of it. But I can only do it for a week. Here’s how it would work:

For three days, I won’t drink cinnamon tea, Wednesday I would drink only the nighttime tea, then the last three days I’ll drink both teas. I’ll eat the same food at the same time every day, take my medications at the same time and check my blood sugar at the same time. That means alarms will have to be set on my phone and I’d have to try and sleep around the same time to be able to wake up around the same time.

I have to wait a couple weeks so I can save up money to buy the food for meal prepping and more prescriptions. Plus, I’m not sure if my doctor is going to give me a new insulin and I’d like to give it at least a week to figure out how it works for me. But when I do start my experiment, I’ll record about it here. I’m kind of excited about it because it’s going to make me feel like a scientist with all the note taking and experimenting.

I’m going to try a couple of days without the tea to see if there is any significant change in my blood sugar readings. So far it’s been looking pretty good although I take my tea either right before or after taking my blood sugar right now so I have to figure out the best time to drink and check. I’ll figure it out eventually.

Oh hey a self love update! I bought a t-shirt and lounge pants with The Child on them and I love them so much. However, the pants were way too long for my short legs so I cut them off at the knees, just below the graphics. Which is good because I can’t inject insulin in my thighs with pants on. I love it like this and I can use the cut off material to either make pillows or face masks, I have options.

The t-shirt is kind of thick and big so I cut the sleeves and collar off and I turned it into a crop top. It comes down to my belly button and it’s very comfy. I’ve decided to use it as my new pajama set, it’s been kind of warm lately anyway. Maybe when it gets colder and I get a little bit more confident I can wear it out in public. I might do it with other shirts that I have. I’m totally in to crop tops right now.

I’ve had issues with loving myself lately with this pandemic and my diabetes so finding something that makes me feel great about myself is a win in these dark times. I greatly encourage you to find that something in your life that makes you love yourself and enjoy it. You don’t have to take it out in to public if you’re not comfortable with that but you deserve to love the way you look and who you are. No matter who you are and what you look like, you deserve to love yourself and the body you’re in.

Lifestyle Change vs. Diet

I’m sure you’ve heard both terms being thrown around a lot, but do you know the difference?

Diet has two definitions:
1. the kinds of food that a person habitually eats.
2. a special course of food to which one restricts oneself, either to lose weight or for medical reasons.

Which one do you hear more of? I’m forever hearing on the tv about commercials of miracle diets for weight loss. Diets don’t work. Why? Because diets are meant to be temporary. A diet consists of temporarily changing your eating habits to promote a certain outcome, like weight loss, before returning to your previous eating habits.

Now lifestyle changes are where it’s at. A lifestyle change consists of adopting healthy overall habits that promote long-term weight control and health. A diet focuses on food intake whereas lifestyle changes your diet with other factors that affect your weight and health, like exercise. In other words, a diet is a temporary solution and lifestyle changes are healthy habits for life.

What kind of lifestyle changes can diabetics make?

  • At least 30 minutes of moderate exercise every day, like brisk walking, water aerobics, hiking, or using a manual lawn mower.
  • Cut back on sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Eat more fruits and veggies.
  • Get rid of junk food and snack on more nutritious foods.
  • Replace refined carbohydrates with wholegrain foods.
  • Reduce amount of saturated fats.
  • Choose lean meats over processed meats.
  • Apply stress management techniques in your life.

Did you know that stress can really mess your body up? Stress hormones can increase blood pressure, slow down your digestion, and can make blood glucose control difficult. Reducing stress can lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, and anxiety.

In my opinion, I never use the word “diet” unless describing something like diabetes diet, even then I don’t mention it often. Why? Because “diet” is a dirty word. I’m not looking for a temporary change, I’m looking to change my life. Your intentions are everything. If you only intend to diet, you are only looking for temporary. Speak it into existence and tell the Universe you are changing your life for the better.

Do you want to know more about a diabetes diet though? Here’s what I have found for you and for myself.

Healthy Carbohydrates:
– fruits
– veggies
– whole grains
– legumes
– low-fat dairy products
Fiber-rich Foods:
– veggies
– fruits
– nuts
– legumes
– whole grains
Heart Healthy Fish:
– salmon
– tuna
– mackerel
– sardines
Good Fats:
– avocados
– nuts
– canola, olive, and peanut oils

When you’re looking for things to eat, remember to avoid these foods:

  • fried fish and fish with high levels of mercury
  • high-fat dairy products
  • coconut oil
  • processed foods high in trans fats
  • high-fat animal proteins

You should aim for no more than 200mg of Cholesterol and less than 2300mg of sodium per day.

Diabetes management is a lifestyle change. We have to create new, healthier habits for our lives to better manage our diabetes. We can do this! Change your life for the better and not for the temporary.


References

Healthy Eating
Diabetes UK
Mayo Clinic


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The Journey: Episode Nineteen

SUNDAY, AUGUST 16, 2020

My blood sugar is looking a little bit better this week. I started drinking cinnamon tea about five days ago and my blood sugar has been in range more days than out of it. I’ve heard of the benefits of cinnamon tea on blood sugar levels and I’ve been wanting to try it out for a while and I finally got around to it. I’ve read that you can use either a cinnamon stick or one tablespoon of ground cinnamon, I finally found cinnamon sticks in a big container at my Walmart so I don’t have to do ground cinnamon.

One thing about cinnamon tea though, is make sure you’re not taking too much of it. It has a compound that could shutdown your liver if you ingest too much of it, but you’d have to take like either a lot or this one cinnamon that has a high amount of that compound. I can’t think of the name right now, so do your research before you start drinking this stuff.

It’s not so bad although if I let it sit for too long, like when I’m waiting for the water to cool down and I’ve forgotten it, it can get a bit spicy. One time I forgot it completely until the water was basically cold and the stick was sitting in the water and it was the spiciest drink I’ve ever had in my life it was a bit hard to swallow but I managed to drink it all. I think it works best when the water gets spicy.

My cinnamon stick stash

I’ve been using one stick twice a day, once in the morning and once before I take my insulin. Then I’ll take my blood sugar and prep my insulin. Man my insulin. I’m running low on funds to buy my insulin, fun times. So I’ve taken to using every drop of insulin I have. Before I’d throw away whatever was left in my pens if it couldn’t make a full dose, because I was afraid of sticking myself twice in a night, and for good reason too, it’s not fun twice in one night.

But since I won’t be able to afford it for much longer I’ve had to double up on needles every couple of days to make my 85 unit doses. It’s not fun and my left leg has already had to do it twice now. I’ve managed ten shots in my right thigh and I’m eight shots in on my left thigh with two nights doubling up. It wasn’t very fun, though last night it wasn’t too bad when the needles went in, but afterwards they both stung and the second one bled a little bit.

I’ve kind of come to terms with double shots some nights, anything to save money really. I’m just upset that I have two insurances and neither of them will pay for my insulin. I’m not sure if my insulin is a life-saving drug, but it’s so important to my health and they won’t cover it, like it’s some optional drug that I don’t need. They’ll pay for my cortisone cream for my eczema but not my insulin. Thank goodness for a manufacturer coupon that makes it cheaper for me, but at $100 a box every couple of weeks is still ridiculous.

This is so ridiculous. But hopefully with the cinnamon tea, exercise, and lower carb intake my blood sugar will be able to get under better control. I hope I can get another insulin or something that I can take a smaller dosage and maybe cheaper? Who knows. Here’s to hoping for a better future for myself.

Big Announcement!

So I made the decision to create some sticker designs that I want to make available for you folks to purchase and stick everywhere and on everything. The stickers just came in and they look really good.

I’m super excited to have these guys up for you. These are just some of the designs I have available right now. So far I have seven stickers designed, I’m just trying to figure out how I’m going to sell them. I could create a shop page on this blog, I’m just not sure how WordPress’ shop program works and if it’s worth it. Or I could create a shop on Etsy, Square, Shopify, etc. but there are a lot of fees with those.

The other thing about this venture is that it does cost money up front to bring these stickers in, so it might be awhile before I can actually start selling these, but I definitely want to make these available for you guys.

F*CK diabetes

This design comes in red and black as well as blue and white.

It’s easily my favorite design. I figure the blue design could help identify you as Type 1 diabetic and the red design as a Type 2 diabetic.

Don’t be a PRICK

This design only comes in this coloration.

I love this design, I just wish it came as a die cut instead of a plain rectangle.

Type 2 diabetic

This is a smaller sticker that comes only in red.

My husband and I think it could come in a bigger size, but what do you think? It’s the smaller of the three.

Here are the other designs I have created, I only got these three as samples to see if the company was really all that. Needless to say, yes they are all that. The watermarks are there to protect my work from any thieves out there.

Why sell stickers?

Well I love stickers and I created these for myself, but then I loved the design so much that I thought maybe you folks might like them too. My husband likes them. He particularly likes the F*ck diabetes in red.

I’d like to hear your opinion on these stickers.

Does Diabetes Affect Hormones?

In short, to answer that question, no, diabetes does not affect your hormones, however, your hormones have a massive effect on your diabetes and blood sugar levels. Hormones are released by various organs and glands within your body that affects pretty much everything.

Some hormones that affect your diabetes are insulin, glucagon, amylin, epinephrine, cortisol, and growth hormone. The most directly related hormones are glucagon and everyone’s favorite, insulin. However, even our own sex hormones can affect our blood sugar levels. In those who have ovaries, estrogen and progesterone levels can affect how well our insulin works, or doesn’t. Same with those who have testes, testosterone levels can cause insulin resistance.

Let’s work out our sex hormones first. Estrogen is the hormone that helps with the development of female sex characteristics. It can also improve insulin sensitivity, however, the loss of estrogen can also lead to insulin resistance.

Insulin sensitivity is when your insulin works properly. Insulin resistance is when your insulin sensitivity is low and your cells can’t use your insulin very well.

Progesterone is the hormone that helps the body prepare for the possibility of pregnancy. Progesterone levels go high in the middle of your menstrual cycle and decrease when you’re about to have your period. If you are pregnant, your progesterone levels go up in preparation for the fetus to protect the fetus and allow proper amounts of glucose. However, high levels of progesterone can lead to insulin resistance.

Testosterone helps with the development of male sex characteristics. Lower testosterone levels lead to insulin resistance.

To counteract the affect your changes in life stages on the way your body interacts with your blood sugar, you should:

  • Keep track of your blood sugar levels and show any fluctuations to your doctor to examine and make any necessary changes
  • Watch your weight, being overweight can lead to out of control blood sugar levels
  • Eat a healthy diet full of high-fiber vegetables
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes per day to help your body use its insulin more properly

You’re going to grow older and your body is going to change, keep up with its changes so you can better manage your diabetes. To learn more about how those life stage changes can affect your diabetes, check out this article.

The other hormones are listed:

  • Insulin – released by the pancreas, allows the body to use glucose for energy by helping cells absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Resistance to insulin will make it difficult for the body’s cells to absorb the sugar causing all that unabsorbed sugar to stay in your bloodstream.
  • Glucagon – produced by the pancreas to control glucose and ketone production in the liver. It gets released between meals and overnight. If you’ve had a high sugar meal, the glucagon won’t be needed as there’s already a lot of sugar in bloodstream which can lead to less and less of the hormone being produced. This low level could cause your blood sugar levels to go too low because there wasn’t enough glucagon to help produce glucose from the liver.
  • Amylin – released along with insulin. It decreases the body’s glucagon levels, this decrease helps to decrease the production of glucose in the liver and slows the rate that food empties out of stomach.
  • Epinephrine – aka adrenaline, released from adrenal glands and nerve endings to stimulate the liver to produce sugar.
  • Cortisol – type of steroid hormone from adrenal gland. Works to make muscle and fat cells resistant to insulin action and enhances glucose production from the liver. High levels of cortisol can lead to insulin resistance.
  • Growth Hormone – released from the brain’s pituitary gland and has the similar functions of cortisol.

All of these hormones help to keep our blood sugar levels in check or keep them out of control. I’m not sure what we can do about helping our hormones to help our blood sugar but there is hormone therapy for our sex hormones.

I don’t think diabetes directly affects our hormones like our hormones do to our diabetes, but having out of control diabetes and blood sugar levels can throw everything out of whack. I hope this post helps lead you to more answers down the line for you.


References

Viveve.com
WebMD
Diabetes Health


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The Journey: Episode Eighteen

AUGUST 10, 2020

So conditions have been unchanged since the last journey update. I went one night without injecting my insulin and the next morning I woke up and my blood glucose was 210 mg/dL. I’m not sure how it would have been if I had taken my insulin that night because we had dinner kind of late that night, after 7pm, and it was pretty carb heavy. But then there’s today. I ate dinner way before 6pm and it wasn’t very carb heavy. When I took my blood glucose at 9am, kind of late because I woke up late, it was 179! So that’s very frustrating.

I think my insulin injections aren’t working as well as they were when I first started taking them. They’re still working thank goodness, but not nearly enough. It’s only a slight change in my numbers between not taking and taking my insulin. So I’m basically paying $99 every two weeks or so for a drug that’s supposed to be helping me, but isn’t.

And that’s another thing. I have Lantus. It’s 5 pens of about 310units each. I’m at 85units now, I can only get three doses from each pen. I don’t use it all the way to 0 because I don’t want to inject myself twice, it’s bad enough doing one each night, plus there are always bubbles no matter how hard I try. I have a coupon card which helps me get my boxes at a discount, I’m not sure what the discount is, but I only pay $99. However, when I tried to fill my prescription on the last week of July, the Pharmacy said if they were to fill it then, I would have to pay full price, but if I waited until next week, it would be $99. Neither of my insurances companies cover my insulin, which completely fucking sucks, so I had to wait, thankfully I had enough left to be able to wait. But now I go through one box in two weeks and I wonder if they’ll be able to fill it at the discounted price. I think I might have to double inject this time just to make it stretch, which doesn’t sound fun at all.

Liliuokalani Park and Gardens – Hilo,HI

My next prescription of Lantus, I’m moving to another pharmacy where it will be hopefully cheaper for me. If not, then I have no idea what to do and I’m screwed. Unless my doctor can give me another insulin which would be a lot better, if it’s cheaper.

Yea the stress of not having enough money to buy my medication and the stress of my medication not working is very…stressful. I’ve been so stressed out lately that I had a breakdown, in front of my boss. Thankfully she was so kind and understanding. We worked out my schedule so I only work one to two hours a day from home and it’s been working a lot so far. I feel less stressed and I’m getting more work done.

I’m looking in to meditation to try and help get my stress levels down on the regular and take time for myself more often. I’ve got a lot of lovely scented candles that I’ve been lighting and it’s been lifting my spirits.

I hope if you’re facing these same hardships in your diabetic journey, that you’ll take some time for yourself. Your mental health is so important and we always forget to take care of ourselves. Go take a nice warm bath. Drink some tea and read your favorite book. Go take a walk outside in the sunshine today. Take some time to slow down and enjoy your life. Even though you have diabetes, that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy this life you were given. Smile at yourself in the mirror and take a minute to love being you. I love you. I am here for you. We can get through this together. You’ve got this!

Blood Sugar and Mental Health

You may have noticed when your blood sugar is too high or too low, your mood suddenly shifts. I know I certainly have. What I didn’t know was what is the link between blood sugar and mood or mental health.

The usual symptoms of low blood sugar are:

  • confusion
  • agression and irritability
  • difficulties concentrating
  • hunger
  • difficulty with coordination and decision-making
  • personality or behavior changes

Some symptoms for high blood sugar are:

  • difficulty thinking clearly and quickly
  • feeling nervous
  • feeling tired/low energy

Fluctuations in your blood glucose can result in rapid mood changes. Low blood glucose readings can cause you to be slightly euphoric. The body compounds this pleasant sensation by releasing adrenaline in an attempt to convert any available glycogen in the liver back into glucose to boost levels in the bloodstream.

There have been some links between diabetes and mental health issues. Scientists have identified a mental health condition in diabetics called diabetes distress. It shares some elements with depression, anxiety, and stress. Most diabetics don’t show severe enough signs to be diagnosed as either depressed, anxious, or stressed but these symptoms can still affect our quality of life.

Did you know that 30 to 40 percent of diabetics are diagnosed with anxiety? Did you know 1 in 4 diabetics have depression and that women are more prone to depression than men? 

If you don’t believe the science, believe the experience. I have been going through anxiety, stress and depression related to my diabetes. How does it manifest? I’m stressed and frustrated that my blood sugar still isn’t within range. It’s more consistently out of range than within range. Because of my high numbers I’ve been getting depressed and overwhelmed that I may never get my diabetes under control. The price of my medications has given me anxiety that I may not be able to afford my insulin and diabetes pills and I have a fear of getting in trouble with a low blood sugar incident in public.

All of these things pile up on my mind and overwhelm me every day, but I’m trying to push forward every day. One day at a time, one hour, and one minute every day at a time.

You may also be feeling these things too. Stressed and powerless when trying to control your condition. Believing you’re not doing a good enough job managing your diabetes.

Maybe you’re anxious about going too high or too low and not being able to recognize when you go low causing a social embarrassment or danger while driving or sleeping. Maybe your rigorous insulin regimen and constant glucose checks could interfere with social interaction or employment.

Please remember, managing your mental health is just as important to your overall health as your diabetes treatment plan.

SOME TIPS FOR COPING

  1. Follow your diabetes treatment plan. Especially when it feels overwhelming, keep taking your medications, keep exercising and eating healthy.
  2. Check your blood sugar regularly. Especially when you feel a mood change, then you can see what causes your irritability and you can correct your sugar level accordingly.
  3. Automate your plan. If your trouble is not taking your medication on time (this could cause insulin distress), setup an alarm for your medication.
  4. Plan your meals. Plan out your meals ahead of time, by the ingredients you need when you need them, prep your ingredients ahead of time, and always have a set meal schedule. Eat healthy and regularly to keep your sugars in check.
  5. Seek out help. This is so important. There are so many resources out there for you to utilize. Go to your doctor, find a diabetes educator, go to a diabetes management class, seek out a therapist, keep a strong support network. If you feel like you have no one to talk to that understands you, you can try reaching out to me.

You are not alone in your diabetic journey. You always have someone to talk to. Take care of yourselves today. Remember to love yourself and don’t be too hard on yourself today. Safe journey and blessed be.

The Journey: Episode Seventeen

AUGUST 3, 2020

So it’s been a long while since I last posted. A lot had been going on during July with helping my sister with her move and then cleaning up after she left, she left a surprising amount of stuff behind. We had a ceremony for my dad’s ashes in July which took a lot of planning. Then there was our storage unit we had to go through. It was all very overwhelming and I hadn’t expected on taking a hiatus from The Young and Diabetic, so I deeply and sincerely apologize.

On to the journey, not so great. So I’ve been injecting in to my thighs for a bit, it’s not super fun, but it doesn’t hurt as much as injecting in to my abdomen. I actually miscalculated the injections in my thighs and only did 15 shots per thigh when I could have done a lot more, but I used quite a bit of my outer thighs so I decided to give them a rest for two weeks and went back to injecting in to my abdomen, man it was sore. I forgot how sensitive my abdomen was. My pen only does up to 80 units but I’ve gone up to 85 units of insulin which means in the middle of injecting, I have to stop and twist the plunger back 5 units to make 85. I definitely don’t want to reinject the needle. HELL NO!

I use a One Drop meter and with it I have a monthly subscription for test strips. Thanks to the monthly subscription, I have access to a diabetes coach. My coach, Rachel, had asked me if I ever talked with my doctor about possibly switching to another insulin brand that was stronger so I could do smaller dosages. I didn’t even know that was a thing! I was worried that my doctor would switch me to an insulin that needed to be taken with each meal. I think a stronger but smaller dosage would be great because a larger dosage takes forever to inject.

My next doctor appointment is on August 25th so I’ll definitely bring it up with my doctor. Then we’ll see what we can do. Right now, I’m injecting in my thighs again. I’m on my right thigh and I’m going to do about ten injections on my thigh in a line with a 1/4″ distance between injection sites before moving to the next thigh.

I’m still really upset that now I have to stop mid-injection to up my dosage by 5 units and my hands involuntarily shake and move the needle AND MY GLUCOSE IS STILL HIGH! It’s so frustrating and a couple of times, I’ve bled because my hand shakes too much and it all just sucks.

Honolii Beach Park – Hilo, HI

My glucose ranges from 120 to 170 in the morning and anything above 125 is an evil number and it’s like no matter what I do I can’t seem to keep my numbers down. Some times it’ll be nice and low but I don’t know what I did to get that number and when I try to replicate it the next day, my number is over 150, like WTF!?

So annoying and so frustrating. I feel like I’m stressing out and I can’t stop stressing and I feel like everyone around me is adding to my stress and it’s getting overwhelming. I can’t even get a good night’s sleep. I’m lucky if I fall asleep before 10pm. Sometimes I won’t fall asleep until almost 3am. Like what is going on with my body! I’m sorry I didn’t mean to just lay all that out for you.

Anyway, I’m going to keep pushing ahead and I’m going to try to get back on my content schedule as best as I can, even though this one is a day late. Please don’t worry about me, I’ll get through this. I always do.